Category Archives: Sport Climbing

Jordan

One of Jordan's best known wonders - Petra. Photo - Calum Muskett

One of Jordan’s best known wonders – Petra. Photo – Calum Muskett

My first visit to Jordan was through a work trip for a project set up between the UIAA (International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation) and the Jordanian Tourism Board to run trekking and climbing leader courses to help create new, skilled job opportunities for the local Bedouin. This was to be the third series of courses of its type run in the country and the aim of them is to work on the successes that the UIAA’s mountain training scheme in Nepal has had. Accredited qualification streams set up to create safe working practices and build up the knowledge base and skills in country for the qualifications to become self-sufficient and no longer reliant on employing foreign instructors or guides. In the UK and much of Europe we have well developed and established qualification pathways that allow for skilled job opportunities in the outdoors as well as recognised ‘best practise’ which is not only of benefit to instructors, coaches and guides, but also to clients who will benefit from safer, more informative and more enjoyable days out. These are the skills we tried to impart with our friends in Jordan in the hope that some will come to enjoy working in the outdoors as much as we do.

Teaching ropework to the Bedouin. Photo - Calum Muskett

Teaching ropework to the Bedouin. Photo – Calum Muskett

I was very fortunate to travel around Jordan with Khaled from the tourist board as well as the Bedouin we were working with and between the work we managed to visit the alien landscape of the Dead Sea and Wadi Mujib, the high mountain oasis of the Dana Biosphere, old crusader country surrounding Shobak castle, little Petra and its spectacular bigger brother of Petra, before finally arriving in the desert of Wadi Rum in the far south of the country. What struck me almost immediately whilst travelling was how kind and welcoming the people of Jordan are, we were constantly being invited to share the Bedouin staple of sweet tea’s and being told stories by proud locals of the often-fascinating histories of their home areas.

Jordan is a wonderfully diverse country with respect to its landscape, culture and history. It was refreshing to come to a country where attitudes towards refugees, forced to leave troubled homelands, were far more sympathetic and respectful than our comparatively trivial “illegal immigrant” problem our mainstream media keep complaining about. Jordan’s economy has taken a huge hit since the fall-out of 2011’s Arab Spring. The tourism industry, which has historically contributed 20% of GDP, has crashed by over 50% amid fears of terrorism in the Middle East. This unfortunate Western stereotype couldn’t be more misplaced in what I have come to think of as an extremely safe and welcoming country – the biggest danger you are likely to encounter is that of the regular unmarked traffic bumps!

Guiding the spectacular 'Merlins Wand', the climax of the climbing leader course. Photo - Calum Muskett

Guiding the spectacular ‘Merlins Wand’, the climax of the climbing leader course. Photo – Calum Muskett

On the final day of the course we were running I guided the pair I was working with up the Wadi Rum classic ‘Merlin’s Wand’, one of the finest multi-pitch crack climbs in the world and a fitting climax to the week’s activities and learning. Whilst enjoying this spectacular route in Barrah Canyon my eye was drawn to a wall several hundred metres away to a stunning ramp and arête feature that looked barely climbable but one of the finest ‘lines’ I have ever seen. I had a wander over to its base, took a photograph and added the route to a long list of possible future projects – a sort of bucket list I have that never seems to diminish in size.

Steve Long enjoying the wonderful Wadi Rum classic 'La Guerre Sainte'. Photo - Calum Muskett

Steve Long enjoying the wonderful Wadi Rum classic ‘La Guerre Sainte’. Photo – Calum Muskett


The picture that inspired the return trip. Photo - Calum Muskett

The picture that inspired the return trip. Photo – Calum Muskett

On my return to the UK and thinking it would be difficult to convince anyone on a trip to go new routing in Jordan I was very surprised to find that Dan Mcmanus, after having a look at the project on my phone, was more enthusiastic to head out than myself and a plan was hatched to return in the slightly cooler weather of late November to avoid the summer heat of the desert.

In between Jordanian trips I had a busy schedule of work, a British mountain guide assessment and getting married, none of which necessarily contribute to a high level of climbing fitness! Despite this, in the couple of weeks leading up to the trip I hit some form on the local sandstone outcrop of Nesscliffe and had a successful day out which culminated in flashing ‘My Piano’, a technical, bold and superb E8. Finally beginning to feel fit I of course managed to crash whilst downhill mountain biking a couple of days before heading out to Jordan, spraining my AC joint in my shoulder, this was approximately a year after a similar injury was incurred white water kayaking – I should really stick to climbing…

On the way to flashing 'My Piano' at Nesscliffe. Photo - Tim Neill

On the way to flashing ‘My Piano’ at Nesscliffe. Photo – Tim Neill


Downhill biking - so fun but the landings are unfortunately very hard...

Downhill biking – so fun but the landings are unfortunately very hard…

Arriving back in the desert eight months later we headed to Barrah Canyon immediately to try and discover just how possible our project would be. The obvious difficulty of the project as well as the complete lack of traditional protection meant that ground up new routing was realistically out of the window, especially considering that placing expansion bolts in this soft rock would be next to worthless and the only sustainable bolting solution was placing resin bolts.

A question of ethics

The climbing in Wadi Rum has historically been traditional climbing, where adventure is at the heart of the journey and this style and ethic has been nurtured and developed by pioneering climbers such as Tony Howard, author of the areas climbing guidebook. Many fine trad climbs exist in the area and there are still more to be developed, mostly outside of the honeypot areas. Whilst there are many fine climbs that can be traditionally protected, the majority of unclimbed rock faces in the area are featureless slabs, walls and overhangs where there is little, or no, traditional protection to be found. Some may argue that these faces are best left unclimbed if they cannot be protected by removable gear but I find that I will have to interject when people say they should be left for the future; I don’t believe there will ever be climbers capable, or perhaps more precisely willing, to solo fragile sandstone slabs and walls of a standard of 8a or above.

Not climbing these walls due to a ‘no bolts’ policy massively restricts the potential of future development in Wadi Rum and I believe a happy equilibrium can be continued, like it has these past 15 years, where sport routes and trad routes can exist in equal measure. From what we found the locals gave little thought to the petty climbing ethics that as a wider community we share. In few other areas that I have visited has climbing felt like such a selfish and strange pursuit, where reflection and introspection left me with more questions than answers about what it is that I do. At the same time, that isn’t an excuse for a carte blanche to do whatever you want, ethics, albeit in such a unique activity as climbing, make us human and add immense value and meaning to the climbing community, one of a plethora of reasons that climbing is more of a lifelong activity than many other sporting pursuits.

Camp in Barrah Canyon. Photo - Calum Muskett

Camp in Barrah Canyon. Photo – Calum Muskett


Scoping out new route potential. Photo - Calum Muskett

Scoping out new route potential. Photo – Calum Muskett


Dan jumaring back up after discovering no holds! Photo - Calum Muskett

Dan jumaring back up after discovering no holds! Photo – Calum Muskett

After scoping out the line from below we made a beeline for the top of the cliff via another route and spent our time abseiling down and working out just how possible it would be climb back up. The majority of the climbing looked feasible, albeit at a high technical standard, but we were somewhat dismayed to find that there were three very short sections of very thin climbing and although it may have been possible to climb by somebody, it certainly wasn’t for us. Our plan B was a bit of an afterthought, a quick inspection of the impressive but blank looking wall to the right to see if we could find any features up close. We were pleasantly surprised to find a ‘just’ possible line up the wall featuring extremely thin slab and wall climbing on excellent quality sandstone and immediately knew that we’d found our project.

After a few days of touring the country with my wife Gabby and Dan’s girlfriend Kim we were back in the desert and re-energised for an attempt at the route. The first pitch is the shortest and easiest by far, but still a pleasant 7a+ warm up for the main events to come. I set off on the second pitch feeling reasonably confident but slightly nervous since it was the first time I’d been on the sharp end on anything harder than 6a for a couple of weeks. We anticipated this to be the crux pitch with around 50m of thin slab and wall climbing of around 8a in difficulty. I shook my way through the crux and, thinking I had the pitch in the bag, managed to fall off at the end of the longest run believing that my hopes were dashed for the day. After lowering back down Dan managed a smooth lead and I seconded the pitch cleanly to set us up for the next pitch.

The final two pitches are about 45m and 55m in length with some hefty run outs between the bolts as we began to grow short of them. Although I’d had a quick play on the moves on both pitches I wasn’t very well prepared for leading them but thought I’d get cracking anyway. The third pitch is an immaculate wall climb with amazing ‘biscuit’ like flakes sticking out of the wall. Nearing the end of the pitch my forearms were really beginning to burn and I had to grunt my way up to the belay to what I thought was the end of all the hard climbing – how wrong was I to be.

Climbing the crux pitch of 'Yalla Shabab'. Photo - Gabby Muskett

Climbing the crux pitch of ‘Yalla Shabab’. Photo – Gabby Muskett


The spectacular and improbable third 7c+ pitch. Photo - Gabby Muskett

The spectacular and improbable third 7c+ pitch. Photo – Gabby Muskett

The final pitch has some of the longest run out sections on it but also seemed like it would be relatively easy on abseil so I told Dan that he should be able to scamper up it in no time. Unfortunately, my prediction couldn’t have been more wrong and the tricky climbing mixed in with the long run outs left Dan cursing me for sandbagging him. I ended up taking over the lead and was surprised to find this pitch a real sting in the tail at a bold 7b+, an excellent finale but not quite the finishing romp we’d anticipated!

We’ve ended up calling the route ‘Yalla Shabab’, an Arabic phrase that was used repeatedly on the training courses I ran which translates roughly as ‘Let’s go!’ We hope others get the opportunity to enjoy the route just as much as we did in the future and would highly recommend the climbing of Wadi Rum to anybody who likes a bit of adventure, or indeed mixing up climbing and culture.

Yalla Shabab topo

Yalla Shabab topo

Gorge du Tarn

Springtime in Gorge du Tarn. Photo - Calum Muskett

Springtime in Gorge du Tarn. Photo – Calum Muskett

Gorge du Tarn, in the South of France is one of the most idyllic sport climbing areas in Europe. The gorge has a very relaxed atmosphere and it’s always possible to find shade in amongst the pine trees to escape the mid-day heat. The quantity of big, pocketed limestone walls and towers in the Gorge du Tarn and neighbouring Gorge du Jonte is impressive to say the least and the available rock isn’t grid bolted and polished like many other popular sport climbing areas. Friends had recommended this area to me several times before but I’d always previously opted for trips to northern Spain due to the convenience of flights and car hire. In retrospect I wish I’d done a little bit more research because flights to Rodez airport are cheap and it’s a relatively short journey from there to reach the Gorge du Tarn.

The holiday was a bit of a last minute one following an invitation to join the Neill family (Tim, Lou and Esme) but with seven free days I couldn’t resist a bit of guaranteed sunshine! On our first day we visited the awesome Tennessee sector and started to get used to the long stamina routes, quickly learning that climbing in the mid-day sun was a bad idea. This was a fantastic discovery as it allowed for us to have very lazy mornings worthy of a proper holiday!

Tim accompanied by the vultures in Gorge du Jonte. Photo - Calum Muskett

Tim accompanied by the vultures in Gorge du Jonte. Photo – Calum Muskett

The following day we visited the Gorge du Jonte, which is the neighbouring valley, for a multi pitch route I’d spotted in the guidebook. The route’s called ‘Histoire Deux Fous’ and looked like a fantastic proposition taking in the awe inspiring right arête of a big cliff with a crux pitch of 8a. Following a couple of interesting warm up pitches we were left with the main event. I’d heard that the bolts were a little spaced on this pitch but hadn’t thought much of it at the time. When I was up there with plenty of exposure to boot, my legs turned to jelly and climbing on these run out sections felt utterly gripping. I had to hang off a couple of bolts just to muster up the necessary will power for upward progress and finally got to the belay – a little bit hot and bothered! Although the climbing was pretty straightforward I wasn’t that psyched for red-pointing which is a shame as in retrospect I’d have loved to have finished the job off. It’s a great route though and well worth the attention of anyone visiting the area and in search of something a little more adventurous. There are great views of Vultures up on those cliffs too.

Leading the crux pitch of 'Histoire Deux Fous'. Photo - Tim Neill

Leading the crux pitch of ‘Histoire Deux Fous’. Photo – Tim Neill


Tim enjoying (?) the exposure on the crux. Photo - Calum Muskett

Tim enjoying (?) the exposure on the crux. Photo – Calum Muskett

For the rest of the trip we started heading out later and later, trying to allow as much time for our arms to recover as possible. By the seventh day on my arms weren’t much good for anything other than picking up pain au chocolat and a cola! We visited plenty of great crags climbing sport routes as long as 50m in length which was fun and quite unusual. There’s a huge amount of variety in the climbing too, from short and fingery routes to long overhanging pocketed walls. I’ll definitely be returning to this area in the not too distant future. Thanks for a great trip Tim and Lou!

Vulture. Photo - Calum Muskett

Vulture. Photo – Calum Muskett


Big Tim - too pumped to lift his arms up! Photo - Calum Muskett

Big Tim – too pumped to lift his arms up! Photo – Calum Muskett

2013

2013 has been a great year for me. Lots of travelling, stacks of climbing and amazing weather (with one notable exception!). Rather than writing an account of all the best moments I’ve selected a photo from each month and added a sentence or two with each one as an explanation. Enjoy!

January

Andy Turner ice climbing in Setesdal. Photo- Calum Muskett

Andy Turner ice climbing in Setesdal. Photo- Calum Muskett

I spent the New Year and the first part of January in the Setesdal Valley of Norway; a spectacular ice climbing area although a bit on the warm side whilst we were there!

February

Mina climbing 'La Cara Que No Miente' 8a+ in Siurana. Photo- Calum Muskett

Mina climbing ‘La Cara Que No Miente’ 8a+ in Siurana. Photo- Calum Muskett

After a great sport climbing trip to Siurana in Spain I headed back to North Wales feeling fit and enjoyed some great days out on the sea cliffs of Gogarth.

March

Skiing down the Vallee Blanche. Photo- Calum Muskett

Skiing down the Vallee Blanche. Photo- Calum Muskett

I spent the whole of March in Chamonix learning to ski and made my first, aborted attempt to climb a very snowy North Face of the Eiger.

April

Skiing in the Carneddau. Photo- Jamie Holding

Skiing in the Carneddau. Photo- Jamie Holding

April was an amazing month. The weather and conditions were just incredible! On one day I went skiing down Glyder Fach at first light, climbed an E6 at Gogarth, did some instructing in the afternoon and then ice climbed by head torch in the evening!

May

Climbing 'Daisy World' E7 6c. Photo- Ed Booth

Climbing ‘Daisy World’ E7 6c. Photo- Ed Booth

With the continuing good weather I spent loads of time trad climbing in the mountains of North Wales and climbed a bunch of routes I’d been hoping to try for a long time.

June

George Ullrich on-sighting  'Authentic Desire' E7 6b, on Cloggy. Photo- Calum Muskett

George Ullrich on-sighting ‘Authentic Desire’ E7 6b, on Cloggy. Photo- Calum Muskett

More time spent climbing in the mountains climbing with James Mchaffie and co and the first trips up to Cloggy.

July

George Ullrich leading the 'Indian Face' E9 6c. Photo- Calum Muskett

George Ullrich leading the ‘Indian Face’ E9 6c. Photo- Calum Muskett

After a great quick trip to Hoy in Scotland I returned home and jumped on the send train for an ascent of the ‘Indian Face’.

August

Leading the crux pitch of 'Paciencia' 8a, on the North Face of the Eiger. Photo- Alexandre Buisse

Leading the crux pitch of ‘Paciencia’ 8a, on the North Face of the Eiger. Photo- Alexandre Buisse

August was spent in the Alps. After some fun climbing around Chamonix I met up with Dave Macleod and we climbed ‘Paciencia’ on the North Face of the Eiger – a fantastic route and a great experience.

September

Dave Macleod on the crux pitch of 'Bellavista' 8c on Cima Ovest. Photo- Calum Muskett

Dave Macleod on the crux pitch of ‘Bellavista’ 8c on Cima Ovest. Photo- Calum Muskett

After our short lived attempt on ‘Bellavista’ at the end of August Dave returned to finish it off in September. Unfortunately I just had lots of work to do!

October

Twid walking down the Bader valley in Patagonia. Photo- Calum Muskett

Twid walking down the Bader valley in Patagonia. Photo- Calum Muskett

I became an MIA at the beginning of the month and then headed out to a very windy Torres del Paine in Patagonia!

November

Twid hanging out on the lower slabs of 'Wall of Paine'. Photo- Calum Muskett

Twid hanging out on the lower slabs of ‘Wall of Paine’. Photo- Calum Muskett

Our trip to Patagonia was thwarted by bad weather but we had a good crack and got to the top of the wall of the south face of the South Tower of Paine.

December

Cerro Torre. Photo- Tim Neil

Cerro Torre. Photo- Tim Neil

December isn’t over yet! I’m off to Scotland next week and then to Patagonia with Dave Macleod on the 31st to attempt to make a free ascent of the Compressor Route on Cerro Torre – really looking forward to this one!

I’ve also made a couple of changes with my sponsors this month. Having been sponsored by DMM for four years it’s with a heavy heart that I say thanks for all the help and goodbye. I’m now joining the Black Diamond team and am really looking forward to working with such a well respected company that have such a great product range. I’m also very happy to be combining two of my great passions – climbing and eating, with my other new sponsor Clif Bar. Hopefully my sweet tooth won’t lead me down the path of obesity! On top of this I’m also really happy to be joining Shauna Coxsey, Fran Brown, Molly Thompson-Smith, Hazel Findlay, Steve Mcclure and James Mchaffie as a BMC Ambassador. The BMC have done a huge amount of work in Britain helping access to the hills and climbing areas as well as improving access to the sport; it’ll be great to support them through 2014.

Here’s to hoping next year will be just as good as this one!

Kalymnos

The island of Telendos from Kalymnos. Photo- Calum Muskett

The island of Telendos from Kalymnos. Photo- Calum Muskett

About a month ago I received a text from Colin, an old friend of my parents, asking if I would be keen to go on a sport climbing holiday to Kalymnos. I’d heard about how good the climbing was in Kalymnos, how beautiful the beaches were and how nice the weather was there so it seemed like a no brainer. In North Wales the weather’s been dreadful, I haven’t been able to try my projects at all because of the rain (and snow!), and I even got hot aches rock climbing at Ogwen last week! So I was more than happy to be going on a holiday to a sunny Greek island.

Despite having good intentions of getting really fit before going, all I seem to have been doing of late is bouldering, which isn’t great when the vast majority of sport routes in Kalymnos are longer than 30m in length! So I wasn’t overly optimistic of climbing very hard when I got to Kalymnos and was just looking forward to a nice relaxing holiday with some climbing.

The first thing I noticed about Kalymnos when I arrived is that it had a really nice, relaxed, seaside atmosphere unlike any other climbing destination I’ve been to and very different from your typical Spanish or French sport climbing destinations. The first crag we saw was the Grande Grotta, Kalymnos’ premiere crag. It looks pretty amazing from a distance as you can make out all the stalactites hanging from the roof like grapevine. But it isn’t until you walk underneath it that you realise its scale. As a cave itself it’s big and impressive, but with “its million year old stalactites” it’s something else. My first route in Kalymnos was DNA, the most amenable route up the main section of the cave which ascends 20m up to a lower off amongst a sea of stalactites. An amazing route which illuminated the quality of climbing the island has to offer.

The amazing Grande Grotta. Photo- Calum Muskett

The amazing Grande Grotta. Photo- Calum Muskett


A climber enjoying the steepness of Fun de Chichunne. Photo- Calum Muskett

A climber enjoying the steepness of Fun de Chichunne. Photo- Calum Muskett

The first couple of days were spent checking out some of the different areas around the Grande Grotta and Odyssey areas where we climbed some brilliant routes of all grades which were mainly very featured with tufa’s and stalactites requiring a creative style of climbing. On the third day with weary arms we plodded back up to the Grande Grotta where I decide it was time to have a go at one of the big routes of the cave, a 40m stamina fest called Priapos. It felt just as intimidating setting off on this as it would up a big wall! The angle of rock just seemed so steep and long that it made free climbing seem improbable but fortunately the holds were massive and the rests were ridiculous- straddling stalactites, upside down kneebars and spacey bridges. Although all the climbing was easy it took a certain amount of ‘hanging in there’ and skills at finding rests to reach the top. It’s undoubtedly the best sport route that I’ve ever done. It was so overhanging I had to second it to get all my clips out!

Buoyed up with my success and amazed at the quality of the climbing in the cave I decided to have a rest day and return to try a longer, steeper and harder route. The route I chose is called Fun de Chichunne and ascends 40m up/into the grande grotta. Generally I’ve always been wary of climbing roofs as I know that my arms quite quickly reach a point of irretrievable meltdown. But I thought that I might just about be able to find enough rests amongst the stalactites to keep the pump at bay for just long enough to clip the chains on this one. My optimism however was short lived after getting very pumped after the first 10m of climbing and I was struggling to get my knees into an awkward and painful jam amongst two stalactites (3/4 length trousers are de riguer for this stuff). After resting for as long as my knees could tolerate I climbed quickly upwards to probably the hardest move on the route except the blob of rock I was hoping to use was soaking and unusable. By this point I’d almost given up hope of getting up this route but I managed to pull off some wacky footwork using a totally different sequence and just managed to slap my way across to an uncomfortable sitting position on a stalactite. I think I spent half an hour sitting here trying to recover and the rest of the route was a similar story to what came before, skipping clips, being unable to chalk up and resting for as long as possible in all the cramped and awkward positions the stalactites force you into. I seriously thought that I was about to fall off at least six times but I eventually got to just below the chains where I was faced with yet another ‘more awkward than it looks move’, I wasn’t going to throw away the previous 40m of hard won effort though and I made the final move and clipped the chains a very happy and exhausted man. This is my first 8a on-sight and probably the hardest of the 8a’s that I’ve done, so I’m very pleased to have managed it as it’s been a lifetime ambition of mine.

Making the most of one of the crazy rests on Fu de Chichunne. Photo- Colin Rowe

Making the most of one of the crazy rests on Fu de Chichunne. Photo- Colin Rowe

The final day of the holiday was spent climbing more classic routes and swimming and sunbathing on the beaches. I’d highly recommend Kalymnos as a destination for any climber or non-climber and I’m sure I’ll be returning at some point in the future.

Margalef

Evening light at l'Hermitage. Photo- Calum Muskett

Evening light at l’Hermitage. Photo- Calum Muskett

I’ve just returned from a fantastic few weeks in the Spanish sport climbing Mecca of Margalef. Despite having been on many climbing trips, mainly multi pitch trad or alpine climbing this was my first sport climbing holiday and great fun.
I travelled over to Spain with a group of friends from all over Britain meeting up with other friends already out there. Our first destination was Margalef, a small village nestled in between two valleys full of amazing climbing on conglomerate cliffs. There is enough climbing here to keep you occupied for a lifetime and there are certainly twice as many undeveloped areas out there as developed ones. The climbing is often on positive pockets varying between full handholds and single finger pockets on a plethora of different angles; it’s slightly difficult to get used to at first but very enjoyable and aesthetic when you do.

Dave Rudkin climbing another pockety line. Photo- Calum Muskett

Dave Rudkin climbing another pockety line. Photo- Calum Muskett


Dr Feelgood, a classic 8a in Margalef. Photo- Calum Muskett

Dr Feelgood, a classic 8a in Margalef. Photo- Calum Muskett

I only tried on-sighting or flashing routes as I don’t have the patience to repeatedly fall off the same route- especially on holiday! It was really fun climbing like this as in Wales you end up having to red-point sport routes or else you run out of things to do. I was astonished at how relatively poor my stamina was for resting and climbing long routes, some of the holds I fell off were jugs! My favourite venues in Margalef were Fenestra for its variety of styles of climbing and its northerly aspect, important for hot days and the Hermitage, a beautiful venue at the head of a valley with some long routes on perfect rock beginning off a ledge.

Rest days were equally enjoyable eating food, learning mathematical theorems off Blair and Tony (!) and playing a game of cards called ****head which often decided upon who was making brews or doing the dishes!

We also made a quick trip up North to an area called Terradets with the justifiably famous crag Les Bruixes. This is an amazing wall of tufas overhanging considerably and with rather long routes, in fact, routes longer than my arms could sustain me up! Unfortunately, the weather wasn’t great whilst we were up there and I caught a cold so we decided to head back to Margalef which is a bit further south and at a lower altitude. The final week of climbing was also enjoyable and the final day was spent climbing (sunbathing!) in the sun above an ocean of clouds.

I feel really fit now that I’m back home but Wales isn’t the perfect place for rock climbing in December so I might start sharpening my ice axes in (hopeful) anticipation of a good winter and start getting the Rab duvet jackets out!

Guy Steven going big! Photo- Calum Muskett

Guy Steven going big! Photo- Calum Muskett


Iain Small 'hanging in there' in Spain. Photo- Calum Muskett

Iain Small ‘hanging in there’ in Spain. Photo- Calum Muskett